Georgia Tech Issues Response to NCAA Findings

Results from NCAA's 20-Month-Long Investigation

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Committee on Infractions has found the Georgia Institute of Technology men’s basketball and football programs have committed violations of NCAA regulations.

Press Conference Addressing NCAA Announcement
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The Institute was cited for a lack of cooperation during the investigation, a failure to meet the conditions and obligations of membership and preferential treatment violations. There were additional violations in the men’s basketball program related to rules stemming from a nonscholastic basketball tournament conducted on the Institute’s campus, which the public report further details.

“Georgia Tech is committed to the integrity of its athletics program, including full cooperation and support of the NCAA,” said Georgia Tech President G. P. “Bud” Peterson. “Given the information we had at the time, I believe we took reasonable and appropriate steps to determine the proper course of action and acted in good faith. Looking back, there are things we could have done differently. Because of our unwavering commitment to NCAA compliance, we have already taken a number of steps to address perceived shortcomings, hopefully ensuring that our programs remain beyond reproach.” 

After being notified of the allegations in November 2009, Georgia Tech conducted its own internal investigation, forming a committee made up of faculty, staff and external counsel that made recommendations based on available information and the internal investigation findings.

As a result of this exhaustive review process and because of Georgia Tech’s steadfast commitment to compliance, the Institute completely revamped and enhanced its athletic compliance operation and staffing. Changes include a greater investment in experienced staff, training and awareness among staff and student athletes.

Penalties include:

  • Public reprimand and censure.
  • Four years of probation from July 14, 2011, through July 13, 2015. The report further details this probation.
  • A $100,000 financial penalty.
  • A reduction of two men’s basketball recruiting days during the 2011 summer evaluation period (self-imposed by the Institute).
  • A limit to 10 official visits for men’s basketball for the 2011-12 and 2012-2013 academic years.
  • A vacation of all contests won by the football team during the 2009 season after November 24, which is when the university was alerted to the potential eligibility issues.

The Institute is considering options including whether to appeal the NCAA decision.

“I want to reemphasize Georgia Tech’s unwavering commitment to compliance and our commitment to the conditions and obligations of membership of the NCAA,” said Peterson.