Professor Lu Receives Prize in Systems Biology

Hang Lu, associate professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has been selected to receive the CSB2 Prize in Systems Biology, which is sponsored by Merrimack Pharmaceuticals and by the Council for Systems Biology in Boston. 

The CSB2 Prize in Systems Biology is awarded annually to a young scientist for exceptional contributions to the development and implementation of new methods in biomedical research. Lu was selected for development of microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip instruments for manipulating and studying living embryos and nematodes.

Lu, who is part of Georgia Tech’s Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience, received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003 and served as a postdoc at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California and the Rockefeller University before coming to Georgia Tech. 

She has received other awards including the DARPA Young Faculty Award, the DuPont Young Professor Award and the National Institutes of Health Mentored Quantitative Research CAREER Development Award. Her research lies at the interface of engineering and biology. Lu's lab engineers microfluidic devices and BioMEMS (Bio Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) to study neuroscience, genetics, cancer biology, systems biology, and biotechnology. 

The Council for Systems Biology in Boston builds local, regional, and national links between academic and industrial laboratories active in the areas of systems and computational biology. CSB2 is dedicated to promoting quantitative, systems and synthetic biology in the Boston area and beyond by promoting interactions among academic and pharmaceutical laboratories, organizing international symposia and recognizing the achievements of promising young scientists and engineers.