Tech Professors Chosen To Attend "Frontiers of Engineering" Symposium

Justin Romberg, assistant professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor David Sholl of the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering are two of 86 young engineers selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) 16th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium.  

Engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing exceptional engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines will come together for the event. The participants – from industry, academia and government – were nominated by fellow engineers or organizations and chosen from approximately 265 applicants. "As we face the challenges the next century brings, we will rely more than ever on innovative engineers," said NAE President Charles M. Vest.  "The U.S. Frontiers of Engineering program is an opportunity for a diverse group of this country's most promising young engineers to gather together and discuss multidisciplinary ways of leading us into the economy of tomorrow." 

The symposium will be held Sept. 23-25 at the IBM Learning Center in Armonk, N.Y., and will examine cloud computing, autonomous aerospace systems, engineering and music and engineering inspired by biology. Sponsors for the 2010 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering are IBM, The Grainger Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Department of Defense (DDR&E), National Science Foundation, Microsoft Research and Cummins Inc. 

The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, nonprofit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology.  Its members consist of the nation's premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements.  Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. 

 

 

The Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the world's premier research universities. Ranked seventh among U.S. News & World Report's top public universities and the eighth best engineering and information technology university in the world by Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities, Georgia Tech’s more than 20,000 students are enrolled in its Colleges of Architecture, Computing, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Management and Sciences. Tech is among the nation's top producers of women and minority engineers. The Institute offers research opportunities to both undergraduate and graduate students and is home to more than 100 interdisciplinary units plus the Georgia Tech Research Institute.