Advanced-Flow Reactor Aids Chemical Synthesis Research

Corning Provides Equipment to Advance Research

Georgia Institute of Technology Professors Charles L. Liotta and Charles A. Eckert will begin working with Corning's Advanced-FlowTM glass reactor in their chemistry research programs. The reactor, donated by Corning, is noted for its ability to provide continuous and efficient mixing and heating at a lab and industrial scale, even with difficult chemical reactions. "We are starting to see more and more continuous manufacturing of chemicals and pharmaceuticals because it provides lower cost and higher quality products. For the chemists and chemical engineers it opens up a whole new world of chemical pathways that are not possible with the use of ordinary batch equipment," said Charles Liotta, regents' professor and interim chair, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology. "We are very excited that Georgia Tech has chosen to use our technology in its notable program," said Dr. Gary Calabrese, vice president, Science and Technology, Corning Incorporated. "Corning's reactor technology is now being readied for deployment in manufacturing locations around the world. The new chemistry that Georgia Tech develops using the Corning Advanced-Flow reactor can have very significant practical impact," Calabrese added. "A fundamental cultural feature of Georgia Tech is the emphasis on interdisciplinary research. The combination of chemistry and chemical engineering in the development of new chemical processes employing the Corning Advanced-Flow glass reactor will create new learning experiences for our graduate and undergraduate students," said the J. Erskine Love, Jr., Professor of Chemical Engineering, Charles Eckert.