Georgia Tech Student Named 2007 Co-Op Student of the Year

Reeve Ingle honored by the Cooperative Education Division of the American Society of Engineering Education

Richard 'Reeve' Ingle, a Georgia Tech Division of Professional Practice (DoPP) co-op student, was recently named 2007 Student of the Year by the Cooperative Education Division of the American Society of Engineering Education (CED - ASEE). Ingle is a senior electrical engineering major with a minor in Spanish, and has a 4.0 cumulative GPA. He has completed four co-op work terms with the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston and an internship with the U.S. Department of Defense in Ft. Meade, Maryland.

As a co-op student at NASA, Ingle worked on a variety of projects, including the design of a dashboard display unit, developing an RF spectrum map for the SCOUT Project (NASA's 'moon-buggy' robot rover), developing electrical systems drawings for the International Space Station Japanese Experiment Module, and investigating methods of cleaning clothing in space. He also trained to be a back-room flight controller in Mission Control Center, wrote a technical report on space exploration research (which he presented at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Banquet in Spring 2005), and was the only co-op student selected to support NASA robotics field testing at Meteor Crater, Arizona, in Fall 2006.

Ingle has been a strong and consistent supporter of both Georgia Tech and NASA's cooperative education programs. He has spoken at on-campus NASA information sessions and designed a Web-based co-op housing guide that is still used on NASA's co-op Website. As a Co-op Ambassador for the Georgia Tech Division of Professional Practice, Ingle spoke about his co-op experience and the benefits of cooperative education at the Academics Beyond the Classroom Expo at the President's Scholarship Reception and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Co-op Information Session.

"He possesses a unique combination of communications, people, and technical skills as exemplified by the diversity of his engineering studies, community service and leadership activities in which he participates," said Tom Akins, executive director of the Division of Professional Practice at Georgia Tech. "It is this breadth of interests, activities and skills that makes him such a strong and well-rounded student and co-op."

Ingle studied in Mexico City and Madrid and worked as a teaching assistant in Mexico City. He has done undergraduate research in the Georgia Tech Optics Lab and also worked as a mathematics teaching assistant. Ingle has been actively involved with Eta Kappa Nu Electrical Engineering Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi Honor Society,Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Christian Campus Fellowship and intramural sports. Additionally, he has volunteered as a host for Connect with Tech, a weekend for prospective students.

In addition to participating in several on-campus activities, Ingle is also actively involved in the community. He was a mentor for the NASA Explorer Schools Reduced Gravity Program and a Texas Aerospace Scholars Volunteer Leader for a rover design program for college students. He has served as a committee chair for Tech Beautification Day and the TEAM Buzz Volunteer Service Organization, and has tutored students with disabilities through the Georgia Tech ADAPTS program. He received the 2003 Outstanding Service in Historical Preservation Award from the Carroll County Historical Society for design of the Carrollton Main Street Association Web site: http://historic.carrolltongeorgia.com.

Among the awards Ingle has received are the NASA-JSC Outstanding Co-op Award; Georgia Tech Outstanding ECE Sophomore; Georgia Governor's Honors Program; and valedictorian of his high school class. He earned the Eagle Scout rank and received a state Boy Scout award for rescuing a person with a broken leg in the Smoky Mountains.

As one of Ingle's supervisors at NASA noted, "I cannot overemphasize how exemplary Ingle was in every facet of his tour with us. We give him our unqualified strongest recommendation as a result of his work here. Ingle truly was one of the most outstanding co-ops I have ever worked with, and I am glad to have had that opportunity."

Ingle will start a PhD program in electrical engineering in Fall, 2008, but has not yet decided upon a school. He plans to work at the NASA Johnson Space Center Electronic Systems Test Lab during Summer 2008.

The Georgia Tech Division of Professional Practice, originally established in 1912 as the Georgia Institute of Technology Co-op Division, places co-op students and interns with employers throughout the world. The Division includes the Co-op, Undergraduate Professional Internship (UPI), Graduate Co-op, and Work Abroad Programs. More information is available at www.profpractice.gatech.edu.