Georgia Tech Participates in New Design Standards

Georgia Electronic Design Center and partners make proposal on cognitive radio standards

Researchers from the Georgia Electronic Design Center (GEDC), Samsung Electro-Mechanics (SEM) and the Electronics and Telecommunication Research Institute of South Korea (ETRI) recently participated in an international standards meeting on the emerging cognitive radio standard.

The GEDC-SEM-ETRI team presented a full proposal to the IEEE 802.22 Standards Committee, which met in Vancouver, British Columbia, during the second week of November.

IEEE 802.22, the new communication standard for wireless regional area networks (WRAN), uses cognitive radio as its main enabling technology. Cognitive radio is a wireless technology that optimizes increasingly crowded spectrum resources by finding and utilizing unoccupied frequencies.

GEDC and SEM contributed the spectrum sensing segment of the team's proposal, which was presented by Kyutae Lim, GEDC's associate director of technology and a research engineer in Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Spectrum sensing technology, considered by many to be the most critical component of cognitive radio technology, uses minimal power to enable rapid analysis of bandwidth usage conditions in a given area.

This technology, developed by GEDC and SEM engineers, is the first research result from Samsung RFIC Design Center at Georgia Tech, established in August 2005.

"As an academic research organization, we're very pleased to be contributing to the new IEEE 802.22 standards," said Joy Laskar, director of Georgia Electronic Design Center and a professor with Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. "We believe our work with Samsung and ETRI will aid in forging a useful new communications standard."

SEM's vice president, Haksun Kim, said, "Samsung Electro-Mechanics Company is gratified to be working with the Georgia Electronic Design Center on the new IEEE 802.22 communication standard. We believe that cognitive radio will lead to important future business opportunities for our company."

ETRI contributed the overall framework of the proposed system, which is based on Orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) technology. The framework concept consists of medium access control (MAC) and physical (PHY) layers.

"ETRI is pleased to have made a significant contribution to the IEEE 802.22 standard proposal, teamed with Samsung and Georgia Tech," said Chang-Joo Kim, director of ETRI's Radio Technology Department. "The work being done by our team and others will accelerate the development of cognitive radio technologies that will enable dynamic spectrum resource management."

About GEDC: The Georgia Electronic Design Center (GEDC) supports world-class research, active and solution-oriented industry collaboration, intellectual property generation and revenue generating commercialization efforts. Supported both by industry partners and federal laboratories, GEDC's research is broadly focused on fostering technology at the intersection of today's communications applications: wireless/RF, wired/copper and fiber channels. For more information, see (www.gedcenter.org).

About SEM: Samsung Electro-Mechanics was established in 1973 as a manufacturer of key electronic components, and the company has grown into one of the industry leaders, thanks to cutting-edge technology and top product quality. SEM pioneered the technological framework for A/V components and materials, multi-layer circuit boards, and mobile communication and optical components. In the late 1990s, operations expanded into the production of digital products with applied high-frequency, software, engineering and design technologies. For more information, see (www.sem.samsung.co.kr).

About ETRI: ETRI, established in 1976, is a non-profit research organization supported by the Korean government. It has developed information technologies such as TDX-Exchange, high density semiconductor microchips, Mini-Super Computer (TiCOM), CDMA mobile telecommunication system, WiBro (Wireless Broadband), and terrestrial DMB. For more information, see (http://www.etri.re.kr)

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Media Relations Contacts: Rick Robinson (404-385-2562); E-mail: (rick.robinson@edi.gatech.edu) or John Toon (404-894-6986); E-mail: (john.toon@edi.gatech.edu).

Technical Contact: Kyutae Lim, Georgia Electronic Design Center (404-385-6008); (ktlim@ece.gatech.edu).

Writer: Rick Robinson